The Candy Book Tag

Well, this is exciting. The lovely Izzy from Thinking and Inking has nominated me for this book tag. This is my first book tag ever, so lets hope I don’t mess it up 😉

Guidelines:
  • When you are tagged, please thank the blogger who tagged you!
  • No one is obligated to participate, even if they are tagged.
  • If you decide to participate, answer the questions and then tag 5 other bloggers.
  • Please notify the people you’ve selected when they are tagged!

Apples – ah. It was deep, meaningful, probably won a lot of awards but, um, it really isn’t your thing.

The Old Man and the Sea by Earnest Hemingway. Sorry to all the Hemingway fans out there but I really disliked this one. I’m so glad that it was a short read because I don’t think I would have been able to finish it otherwise. I am willing to give Hemingway another try though, so if you have any favourites you would like to recommend please do so 🙂

Black Jellybeans – why do these exist?

This is a hard one. I’m not a big fan of soppy romance novels or emotional YA fiction (I wouldn’t touch The Fault in Our Stars with a bargepole!), but if people want to read that then who am I to judge?

(unrelated, but black jellybeans are the best and I’m glad they exist, just saying.)

Chocolate Kisses – aww… This novel had the best romance!

Ummm do I have to answer this one? I don’t read romance novels so I really couldn’t say. Does Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey count?

Gummy Spiders – eek! You had to check under your bed every night for a week after reading this scary one.

When I was a kid, Michael Hoeye’s Time Stops for No Mouse freaked me out! The bit at the end with the plastic surgery machine…*shudder*

George Orwell’s 1984 is also terrifying. Not “check under the bed” scary, but bloody scary nonetheless. I’ve read it multiple times and it still has the power to send my pulse racing and make me feel sick to my stomach.

Jumbo Lollipop – this took you ages to get through, but hey! You finished it!

The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco. I started this novel several times and was never able to get past the first few chapters. However, last year I sat down and persevered and I’m so glad that I did. It’s such an excellent read!

Cotton Candy – Admit it, you loved this when you were younger (you probably still do). Think children’s or MG fiction.

If you know me, this answer will not be a huge surprise…Roald Dahl’s Charlie and the Chocolate Factory is my all time favourite children’s book. I’ve read it more than 100 times and I still have dreams about running amok in the factory. Cows that give chocolate milk, edible wallpaper, chewing gum meals…yes please!

I nominate:

Hamburgers, Heels, and High Rises

The F Lab

Addlepates and Book Nerds

Read at Midnight

Scatterbooker

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4 thoughts on “The Candy Book Tag

  1. Hey Zahia, I didn’t think this would fit as well on my blog (maybe one day I will make a ‘books’ section!) but I still wanted to do the challenge bc it was really fun reading your answers, so here you go 😉

    Apples – ah. It was deep, meaningful, probably won a lot of awards but, um, it really isn’t your thing.
    I thought Jane Austen’s Emma was super boring and never got past the first 50 pages 😛 Same for Joyce’s Ulysses, though I don’t think I’m the only one!
    Black Jellybeans – why do these exist?
    Hmm that’s a hard one. I’m not really into scary Stephen King-style books, but who am I to judge?
    Chocolate Kisses – aww… This novel had the best romance!
    I’m not sure if Patti Smith’s Just Kids counts as a novel, but Patti’s and Robert’s relationship is completely upstaged by the love story between Patti and NYC.
    Gummy Spiders – eek! You had to check under your bed every night for a week after reading this scary one.
    I don’t really go for ‘scary’ books but The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo series was pretty goosebump-inducing.
    Jumbo Lollipop – this took you ages to get through, but hey! You finished it!
    Anna Karenin, which I started last summer (but I’m taking a break, so it’s not actually that bad)
    Cotton Candy – Admit it, you loved this when you were younger (you probably still do). Think children’s or MG fiction.
    Is that even a question?!?! Harry Potter!!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. You are not alone in doubting Hemingway’s value as a novelist. Hemingway was, as Vidal put it plainly, a “master self-publicist”, and indeed even his suicide was good career move, one which happened to channel the unease of the era. Some sympathy is felt when Mailer remarks that Hemingway’s death “was the most difficult death in America since Roosevelt. One has still not recovered from Hemingway’s death. One may never.” — the imaginary public, the “one”, being of course Mailer himself, as it always was. But Mailer, like Hemingway, was full of affectation, a put-on who enjoyed celebrity and created a myth of himself that cannot resist closer scrutiny but does not survive it. There is something to be said about Hemingway’s “hypnotic style”, but I feel, like Vidal, that it never came together in a novel. Rather, read his finest short stories, including “A Clean, Well-Lighted Room”, which Joyce called “one of the best short stories ever written” — a story only 3 pages long.

    Liked by 1 person

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